About your Search

20130321
20130321
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
in fact it's a terrible solution. it was born back in 2011 when obama wanted to raise the debt ceiling. the amount that america can borrow to pay its bills. it's sort of like raising the credit limit on your visa to pay off your mastercard if you had used your mastercard to pay for two trillion-dollar wars. but -- listen, wait. [cheers and applause] they were worth it because now we can use all the free miles to go to the next war. [cheers and applause] but the republicans -- but the republicans would only raise the debt ceiling if the president promised later spending cuts. if those were not passed by an arbitrary date, it would trigger the sequester, a doomsday scenario designed to cripple programs that both sides love. the democrats would see damaging reductions in education, national parks, vaccination programs, food inspection, even the national zoo while republicans would see cuts to everything they hold dear like the military. [laughter] the point is -- [cheers and applause] -- if the two sides failed to come to a compromise in march 2013 would come in likeƑi a lion and go out
the debt ceiling, what did he say about that? >> i did. one of the next fights comeing up here, we could expect to hit the ceiling this summer in august. he says we're not going to agree to raise the debt ceiling without doing something about entitlements. mcconnell says this brings the president to the table so republicans want an equal number of cuts or more cuts than whatever amount they agreed to raise the debt ceiling by. mcconnell says it's got to come from entitlements because you can't do enough of what we've seen so far, discretionary spending. tracy: they want us off the beach in the summer. we'll have another debt ceiling fight, be here in august sweating it out again. >> yeah, can't wait. tracy: i know, me too. rich, take the vacation now, thanks. >> yeah. tracy: ha-ha, okay, you may want to sit for the next story. members of congress workedded together and passed a bill that will keep the government open for the next six months. who knows what happens in six months though. now the deadline was not tomorrow, and there were no filibusters. they actually compromised. should hav
? because we wouldn't raise the debt ceiling. and the republicans said we've got to have some cuts, mr. president. we have got to do something about the debt course. we can't continue. we're not going to allow you to keep running with the credit card of the people of america if you don't show that you're changing your habits and you're containing some of your lust to spend. finally an agreement. he hated it worse than anything. finally an agreement. he signed it. "i agree that if if you will raise my debt ceiling right now of $2.1 trillion, i promise in the future that i'll cut spending $2.1 trillion." if you let me do it over ten years, i'll sign it. but i've got to have my debt ceiling now. less than two years later we've already increased the debt ceiling $2.1 trillion. we're right up there again having to raise the debt ceiling again. it will be a matter of weeks that this has got to be confronted again. well, what about the spending cuts? before the ink was dry on that agreement, signed by the president himself, i've got the document right here, in blue ink, barack obama right the
-- the sequester was terrible. it was only done as a result of the republican blackmail on the debt ceiling. we increased the debt ceiling. people do not understand what that is. it is foreiling says money you have already spent. if you owe money, you cannot pay the bills. you have to pay the bills. otherwise the country defaults. the treasury people tell us that would be catastrophic. so you have to pay the bills. we have raised the debt ceiling 77 signs -- times since world war ii. there is political demagoguery from whatever clinical party was in go the minority. at the end, there was a vote for it. they say if you increase the debt ceiling coming up to cut spending by an incredible amount. over 10 years. white 10 years? arbitrary. -- why over 10 years? arbitrary. 2.4 congress voted for $ trillion in cuts. 2 trillion -- the sequester makes no sense at all. from our point of view, we do not have a that crisis or deficit crisis. we have a jobs crisis. we have reduced the deficit. the only intelligent way to measure deficit is as a percent of the economy. . percent of gdp that is for a simple r
required and order to raise taxes or to break the debt ceiling that we have, to increase the debt ceiling. if we do that, if we put a balanced budget amendment on the floor of the house and senate and if it passes i'll be ready to look at increasing the debt ceiling for the president. if that doesn't happen, i don't see a reason to raise the debt ceiling. let's stare him down on that until somebody gives in. we need to get this spending under control. and the irresponsible policies is not the way to go. obamacare needs to be repealed. we need to restore the rule of law in this country. we got to shrink down the welfare package that's out here. 80 different means tested welfare programs in the united states, just $2.5 trillion for the illegal component of this. a whole lot more if we don't get these entitlements under control. mr. speaker, the solutions are here. they are on this side of the aisle. they're actually in the platform. i endorse many of them. i appreciate your attention and i yield back the balance of my ime. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back his time. does th
debt ceiling issues and then our -- obviously, o national debt and deficits -- neil: are they whistling past the graveyard? >> we'll have an adjustment. i hope not. i hope we continue to build incomes up, keep the corporate profits up, but unless we reform the tax code, unless we reform, obviously, the entitlement programs, unless we get debt and deficit and fiscal issues under control, we're in trouble. neil: senator, i thought you were swimming upstream in massachusetts. amazing, ted kennedy's seat, shocking, actually. maybe you set sights on a national stage where your argument resinates more among folks in the country. are you interested in that? >> i think you need people like me and others. you have rubio, portman, thune, good republicans, a lot of good democrats who bring a common sense approach to who we are -- neil: i know that, but would you specifically, scott brown? >> i'm not ruling anything out, but now i'm happy and honored to be a fox contributor. i'll recharge engines and bring my message to the american people and remind them and challenge them -- i want to challenge t
, they're going to have to during one of the cr's or debt ceiling debates, they are going to have to shut the government down. we still take in 2.7 trillion, will pay for medicare, social security, will pay off our debt, the full faith and credit of the united states, but isn't that the only way that ryan's budget gets done? >> no, no, not at all. ryan's budget, you know, we're going to have a series of sequential battles. what's going to happen is the democrats in the senate are going to ultimately pass some kind of a budget resolution. i doubt it's going to be like this one. republicans in the the house are going to pass the budget committee resolution and these set levels for all of the appropriations committee allowing for protection and that is to say you can have expedited consideration of appropriations bills that fall under that level. the republicans are going to pass bills that have spending lower than the democrats. the democrats are going to have bills, they're higher than the republicans and then we're going to fight it out bill by bill by bill by bill through the balance of
fight over the debt ceiling late they are spring, into the early summer. >> but tucked away in that continuing resolution are some hidden items on guns. making permanent some of the restrictions on the federal government's ability to regulate guns. they're not the major ones, but they were tucked away in there. when people aren't looking at the continuing president, the nra is still holding sway. >> well and andrea, you know, in the wake of newtown, i think we all grappled with the possibility that the politics surrounding gun control had been fundamentally changed. i would say what's happened in the months since then, stripping the assault weapons ban out, skepticism about background checks and high-capacity magazines, suggests that newtown may have changed things for a time, but it's possible it did not change broadly how the public thinks about gun rights, gun restrictions, you know, and et cetera. >> chris cillizza, thank you very much, see you later. and meanwhile, speaking of guns in colorado, the manhunt continues and widens for the unidentified gunman who murdered st
as well if there. we've got it coming up, the debt ceiling in may, and 27th of this month, we are running out of money. we've got to extend that as well. so i think those are the opportunities where you actually have cash on the sidelines, get in. >> then there's jim lacamp. you say when the music stops, forget about looking for a chair to sit in, get out of the room altogether. why? >> there are a lot of things we have to worry about, bill and maria. this cyprus thing is going to set some really strange precedents for the rest of the periphery. what's going to happen when they re-open these banks? we don't know. are people going to pull all their money out? i think they will. that's going to spill over to spanish and portuguese banks. if you could take your money across the street and put it in a german bank, why in the heck would you leave it in a spanish bank, a greek bank, a cyprus bank? you wouldn't. >> why would that push our stock market lower there, though? >> we have a stock market, bill, that's responding the to and improving global economy. everybody has thought, oh, europe is
: yeah, how long? >> it would be only for a few months, so we still face the debt ceiling issue very shortly. >> bill: that comes up next and i think this extension goes until september if i recall seeing -- >> that's right. the end of the fiscal year uh-huh. >> bill: right. congress woman judy chew who represents the seat formerly hell by our good friend hilda solis. who often has come in studio with us. we look forward to seeing you come in the studio with us some day as well. on the issue of immigration reform, even rand paul came out and didn't go as far as the president, but he did say -- put himself in the camp of those who think it's time for immigration reform, dealing with that issue with those of us from southern california have been dealing with for a long time. are you optimistic about chances? >> i am optimistic in this time of people thinking of us being at a partisan strangle hold there is cooperation here. i was very encouraged about the work put out, i do believe that the immigration reform bill will move award. >> bill: if it moves ahead and r
's spain, there's the debt ceiling, there's fiscal cliffs, there's all of thee things. yet if you look back at this past four years the economy has continue to grow. it is what we call the plow horse economy. it is not going to fall over. it is going to keep moving forward, productivity is improving. efficiency is improving and profitability is improving. and that's what's been driving the economy and the stock market. >> one last quick comment, chad. >> it is a big "but." brian is correct that the u.s. government -- u.s. economy's improving. but we still have fundamental issues in the structure of our economy, imbalances. we are not out of the woods yet. we're not in self-sustaining recovery. we need to start to see that to become increasingly more bullish on the financial markets. >> that was really good. you're a good double act. we should have you on more. thank you both. brian and chad. have great days. >>> seven years ago today twitter co-founder jack dorsey sent the first tweet writing just setting up my twitter. since then the media giant has become a staple for millions. it has tra
the debt ceiling ceiling $2.1 trillion ae agreed to reduce spending over ten years, $2.1 trillion. before the ink was dry, the president was proposing to eliminate the cuts he agreed to. he's been fighting to eliminate those cuts from the beginning. and they're really not cuts. they're simply -- if they were properly applied, it would reduce the growth of spending and not cut spending actually at all. so the committee that was supposed to find all the cuts failed. the sequester came into law. it's an antimilitary provision. it was put in by jack lew, a very liberal member of the president's, at that time, chief of staff for offic office of mot and budget. the president seems to be quite happy to see these cuts fall on the defense department. he seems to be happy to have this happen. why do you say that? i say, because he's done nothing to philadelphia it. -- to fix it except demand something that he has no right to demand. that is, to violate this agreement and raise taxes and spend more. and that's not going to happen. congress is not going to vote to violate the agreement they made with
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)